Green building literacy a framework green building journal articles for advancing green building education International Journal of STEM Education Full Text
Green building literacy a framework green building journal articles for advancing green building education International Journal of STEM Education Full Text
Green building education can align quite well with the Earth and Human Activity PEs from Kindergarten through 12th grade. Beginning in Kindergarten with standards that require students to “communicate solutions that will reduce the impact of humans on the land, water, air, and/or other living things in the local environment” to standards such as the fifth grade PE to “obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment” . Green building themes can advance through the upper grades with middle school requirements such as “apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment” and high school PEs such as “use a computational representation to illustrate the relationships among Earth systems and how those relationships are being modified due to human activity” . de Saussure, F. . Course in general linguistics . New York: McGraw Hill. Barr, S., Dunbar, B., & Schiller, C. . Sustainability in schools: Why green buildings have become a catalyst. Educational Facility Planner, 46 , 19–22. Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Anyone you share the following link with will be able to read this content: The result of this process is a toolbox of conceptual frameworks for educators interested in using a systems-based approach to teach about green buildings as sites for complex interactions between human activity and Earth systems. The work here first leverages the broad definition of environmental literacy to advance a working definition for “green building literacy.” Next, major domains of green building knowledge are developed and linked to the Next Generation Science Standards. Green building literacy a framework green building journal articles for advancing green building education International Journal of STEM Education Full Text
Green building literacy a framework green building journal articles for advancing green building education International Journal of STEM Education Full Text
Wirt, F. M. . Politics, products, and markets: Exploring political consumerism past and present . New York: Routledge. Cole, L.B. Green building literacy: a framework for advancing green building education. IJ STEM Ed 6, 18 . s40594-019-0171-6 Beyond increasing factual and conceptual knowledge of green buildings, increasing procedural knowledge of green building issues moves students from understanding into action. Procedural knowledge relative to green buildings involves an expansive array of skill sets. Table  2 offers examples of procedural green building knowledge for each factual knowledge domain. Procedural knowledge in green buildings can draw on various disciplines. It can involve research on building materials, mathematical calculations on energy or financial savings, or hands-on activities such as building furniture from salvaged materials or installing a rain barrel. Procedural knowledge also spans across the life of a built environment—from designing and constructing to inhabiting and maintaining. Simons, R., Choi, E., & Simons, D. . The effect of state and city green policies on the market penetration of green commercial buildings. Journal of Sustainable Real Estate, 1 , 139–166. Table two jumps out as a very effective set of principles and illustrations that dovetails very well into the sort of work that public schools are looking towards when it comes to the meaningful integration of sustainability practices. It's one thing to build the building, but … the practices are everything . A central theme in the Educator focus group was the ways in which frameworks for GBL can be useful to educators and curriculum developers. The conversation began with James noting his frustration with identifying useful frameworks to inform practice. His comments highlighted the challenge of providing frameworks as tools for curriculum development, and particularly the challenge of striking a balance between providing overly broad versus excessively specific guidance. Janice suggested, and the educators all agreed, that alignment between GBL and science standards is a critical missing piece for promoting adoption of green building education in K-12 classrooms. Additional file 1 was created in response to this concern, and the tables therein reveal a multitude of connections between green building themes and the NGSS standards. Policy: As mentioned previously, the topic of politics and policy was noted by BE focus group members as a potentially important issue to include. Inclusion of this category could encourage educators to engage social studies or civics themes into green building lesson planning. This theme could also inspire teaching about the green building rating systems themselves as guidelines that could be adopted into policy in the future. Standards such as these could engage students, for example, in the design process for a piece of furniture for their classroom that meets a set of given functional, social, and environmental criteria. Beyond encouraging technical skills, these projects additionally provide avenues to make connections to themes of esthetics and social justice. In route, students could engage with additional NGSS standards such as MS-PS1-3 that encourages exploration of how “synthetic materials come from natural resources and impact society” and MS-LS2-3 which requires students to “develop a model to describe the cycling of matter and flow of energy among living and non-living parts of an ecosystem.” This is an example of how a single green building theme like furniture design can overlap with the physical and life sciences as students engage in a design process guided by the ETS1 engineering design standards. The sections to follow address each the practical and theoretical aspects of GBL. First, GBL is theoretically positioned within the larger discourses of environmental literacy and science literacy. Second, the “ Major features of green building literacy ” are presented as a set of frameworks that can be used by educators and curriculum developers to integrate green building themes into STEM education. Factual and conceptual green building knowledge. This diagram shows the many ways that green building themes can be connected to broader social and ecological systems The datasets used and/or analyzed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request. Shiao, K. Y., Lin, M. L., & Sung, Q. C. . Curriculum innovation for fostering green building literacy in general education. Applied Mechanics and Materials, 284-287 , 1290–1294. scientific.net/amm.284-287.1290 . NGSS Lead States. . Next generation science standards: For states, by states . Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press. McBride, B., Brewer, C., Berkowitz, A., & Borrie, W. . Environmental literacy, ecological literacy, ecoliteracy: What do we mean and how did we get here? Ecosphere, 4 , 1–20. S13-00075.1 . Krathwohl, D. R. . A revision of Bloom’s taxonomy: An overview. Theory Into Practice, 41 , 212–218. s15430421tip4104_2 . Sorry, a shareable link is not currently available for this article. The author declares that she has no competing interests. International Journal of STEM Education volume  6 , Article number:  18 Cite this article Overall, the group of professionals confirmed and expanded the conceptualizations of green building knowledge, contributing to the overarching question guiding this inquiry, which sought to define key qualities of a green building literate citizen. Despite having a variety of professional perspectives among participants, a key limitation to the focus groups was the sampling frame that began with the author’s own network and expanded outward. Three participants were foreign born; however, the dominant perspectives are US-centric and may need adaptation to other settings. Two members of the Educator focus group did express some concern that “there is going to be a lot of red tape” and logistical issues in terms of connecting school gardens to school cafeterias. Public health concerns, student allergies, and pre-existing contracts with food vendors were several of the potential issues highlighted. McLennan, J. F. . The philosophy of sustainable design: The future of architecture . Kansas City: Ecotone Publishing. Iozzi, L., Laveault, D., & Marcinkowski, T. . Assessment of learning outcomes in environmental education. In Methods and techniques for evaluating environmental education . Paris: UNESCO. Second, consider the occupant actions within buildings that impact the performance of a green building. The repertoire of actions possible within a green building are largely determined by the opportunities a building affords such as recycling, composting, adjusting thermostats, and so on. Schools promoting green building education can align opportunities for environmentally friendly practices within the building with educational programming. The lessons for students are twofold. First, students can build awareness about how the physical built environment is structured to either hinder or support environmental action. Second, students can learn how informed and active building occupants can make a difference for their own school building’s environmental performance. The author would like to thank the panel of experts for their time and insight in the development of the frameworks presented in this study. The author would additionally like to thank Dr. Michaela Zint and Dr. Laura Zangori for their assistance with early drafts of this work. Additional gratitude is extended to the peer reviewers whose constructive feedback contributed greatly to this piece. Marcinkowski, T. . Major features of environmental literacy . Melbourne: Department of Science and Mathematics Education, Florida Institute of Technology. Despite the growing body of research on affect in fields of education, environmental education, and conservation psychology, the study of affect in green buildings is yet in the nascent stages. In the realm of green building literature, we have much yet to understand about how affect is influenced by green building design, and conversely, how green building design practices are advanced by people with positive affective dispositions. Each of these angles—alternatively viewing affective dispositions resulting from and contributing to green building practices—merits further elaboration. Roberts, D. . Scientific literacy/science literacy. In S. K. Abell & N. G. Lederman , Handbook of research on science education . Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Discussion around the specific Table  2 categories comprised the major portion of both focus group sessions. The green building knowledge categories were thus impacted and refined as a result of the focus group feedback. Participants recommended that the titles of the knowledge categories maintain alignment with the prominent standards for green building design, which may be especially helpful for curriculum within schools with certified green buildings. Key points of conversation included: Green building literacy has been an ill-defined term and green building themes have not been rigorously connected to science and environmental education. The work here provides a foundation for promoting green building literacy through K-12 STEM education. The educational tools developed through this process can be used as a starting point for lesson planning to catalyze green building education in a variety of formal and informal settings. Provided by the Springer Nature SharedIt content-sharing initiative Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions . Sung, Q.-C., Lin, M.-L., Shiao, K.-Y., Wei, C.-C., green building journal articles Jan, Y.-L., & Huang, L.-T. . Changing behaviors: Does knowledge matter? A structural equation modeling study on green building literacy of undergraduates in Taiwan. Sustainable Environment Research, 24 , 173-183. U.S. Energy Information Administration. . Annual energy outlook 2012: With projections to 2035 . Washington, DC: Government Printing Office. Numerous professionals asked clarifying questions about what types of school buildings, and school systems broadly, are the target audience for GBL frameworks. Within this conversation, the group discussed the ways that GBL can be promoted in schools both with and without green buildings—and for a spectrum of green buildings from partial renovations to entire new construction buildings. Educators additionally emphasized the importance of ensuring that these themes are not only pursued within special private and charter schools, but also within public school systems that may have less access to resources for green building design. The frameworks presented here are broad enough to apply to both green certified and non-green buildings across both school types and age groups. They are tools for educators and curriculum developers to use as a catalyst for connecting their unique contexts to green building design to advance a great variety of learning outcomes in K-12 science classrooms. Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. Cole, L. B. . The green building as medium for environmental education. The Michigan Journal of Sustainability, 1 , 161–169. s.12333712.0001.012 . © 2021 BioMed Central Ltd unless otherwise stated. Part of Springer Nature . Pastorius, E., & Marcinkowski, T. . A comparative analysis of federal and selected state green school frameworks. In Paper presented at the green schools national conference, west Palm Beach, Florida . By using this website, you agree to our Terms and Conditions , California Privacy Statement , Privacy statement and Cookies policy. Manage cookies/Do not sell my data we use in the preference centre. Roth, C. E. . Environmental literacy: Its roots, evolution and directions in the 1990s . Columbus: ERIC Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education. Sobel, D. . Place-based education: Connecting classroom and community. Nature and Listening, 4 , 1–7. Cole, L. B., McPhearson, T., Herzog, C., & Kudryavtsev, A. . Green infrastructure. In A. Russ & M. E. Krasny , Urban environmental education review . Ithaca: Cornell Press. CHPS . Project scorecard: 2014 U.S. collaborative for high performing school criteria. s.net/sites/default/files/2014_US-CHPS-Scorecard.pdf . Accessed 1 Feb 2019. The engineering design standards within the NGSS additionally present a clear opportunity for green building education. The PEs for these standards were written quite broadly around the idea of “design process,” which can connect to a variety of disciplines such as architecture, engineering, product design, and well beyond. The PEs in ETS1 additionally require rich overlaps between technical, social, and environmental domains such as the middle school Standard MS-ETS1-1: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. . Water Use Today. sense/our_water/water_use_today.html . Accessed 1 Feb 2019. Provisional Alignments between the NGSS and Green Building Knowledge Categories. Marcinkowski, T. . Predictors of responsible environmental behavior: A review of three dissertation studies. In H. R. Hungerford, W. Bluhm, T. Volk, & J. Ramsey , Essential readings in environmental education . Champaign: Stipes. Tawain Green Building Label. . About Green Building Labeling. sh/e_about.php?Type=1&menu=e_about_class&pic_dir_list=0# . Accessed 1 Feb 2019. The ETS1 standards in high school provide similar, and more complex, guidance: Taken together, the categories in Table  2 outline the foundation for an increasingly sophisticated understanding of green buildings. Beyond a grasp of individual building elements is the understanding of the complex interrelationships between building elements, and the ways in which these built features interact with the local communities and local ecologies—the human, air, water, plant, and animal life that are affected by the building . Conceptual knowledge may include, for example, making the connection between a light bulb, functional illumination in the room, and the building energy that comes from a nearby coal power plant, which is then connected to air quality. Another example of conceptual understanding would be making the connection between an exotic hardwood and the cultural and ecological effects of deforestation in another country, a lesson that would highlight themes of building materiality, biodiversity loss, and social equity. Thus, while factual information within the categories described above can be taught and tested, a more advanced curriculum is needed to help students to connect factual knowledge into a systems-level understanding of green building themes. SEED Center. . Defining the Green Workforce. seedcenter.org/Resources/SEED-Toolkits/Defining-the-Green-Workforce . Accessed 1 Sept 2018.
It is an authentic daily practice-driven integration that capitalizes upon required and normal school function, a critical one inside our schools, but we have found that integrating our outdoor garden as well as our hydroponic garden alongside recycling, composting and food donation has been an extraordinarily effective vehicle for all age levels. So I’m glad to see that represented here. “I think it’s low hanging fruit that you are wise to include” . Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Shapiro, B. . Structures that teach: Using a semiotic framework to study the environmental messages of learning settings. Eco-thinking, 1 , 5–17. The Collaborative for High Performing Schools Evaluate a solution to a complex real-world problem based on prioritized criteria and tradeoffs that account for a range of constraints, including cost, safety, reliability, and aesthetics, as well as possible social, cultural and environmental impacts . USGBC. . United States Green Building Council. sgbc.org/ . Accessed 1 Feb 2019. Education and built environment professionals provided input on the frameworks in Tables  1 and 2 . These tables were improved and Additional file  1 was created as a result of participant feedback. The three broad themes addressed by experts are summarized below. While green building themes can be viewed through numerous disciplinary lenses, the current work examines green building design as nested within the broader topics of environmental literacy and science literacy. A green building literate citizen will benefit from foundational knowledge from environmental/sustainability education and science education to understand both the what and why of green building design and ultimately how to engage in transformative green buildings practices. Despite the increasing square footage of green buildings worldwide, green building expertise remains largely in the domain of building industry professionals. However, the performance of and advocacy for green buildings would benefit from a green building literate general public. Green building education is an expanding frontier for STEM education and can create opportunities to integrate science and environmental literacies into the study of everyday environments. Few resources exist, however, to help STEM educators incorporate green building themes into the science classroom. The work here developed educational tools for connecting green buildings and science education through a multi-step process. An interdisciplinary literature review yielded a series of frameworks that were improved through two focus groups with science and environmental educators and built environment professionals. The author made 100% of the contributions to the current work. The author read and approved the final manuscript. Following ethics approval and consent of the participants, the first iterations of Tables  1 and 2 were shared with professionals in two focus group settings. One focus group was comprised of professionals in the realm of environmental and science education , hereafter called the “Educator Focus Group.” The second focus group engaged built environment professionals across interior design and architecture who all had experience in the area of green building design , hereafter called the “BE Focus Group.” Both groups were comprised of a mix of practitioners and academic scholars. A convenience sampling technique followed by a snowball sampling technique were both used to identify and recruit focus group participants. The researcher invited contacts in her own network and requested that those contacts help to identify other professionals who could offer valuable perspective on the topic of green building education. This sampling resulted in a group of experts who are all in North America and mostly located in regions across the USA. The Educator focus group included one West coast educator, a Midwest scholar, a Midwest sustainability coordinator originally from India, an East coast educator, and an East coast non-profit manager. The BE focus group included one scholar from the Mountain West, an architect from the Midwest, a scholar/architect from Turkey who resides in the Midwest, two scholars from the Southern US, a scholar from the East coast, and a scholar from Canada. Both focus group sessions were 60-min long, conducted online, and included a 10-min presentation of the frameworks by the researcher followed by a structured conversation that focused on obtaining expert feedback. Consensus was not derived through successive quantitative surveys, as is common in Delphi panels. Instead, points of contention were discussed as they arose in the focus group setting and the researcher ensured that all points of view were registered before changing topics. Numerous focus group participants indicated that Table  2 with “green building knowledge categories” was one of the key contributions of this body of work. As James, a public school curriculum coordinator, expressed: The transcripts from each focus group were imported into qualitative analysis software and analyzed by the researcher in a two-step coding process that first identified topics of discussion through open coding then a second examination of the data to coalesce topics into broader themes. The final Tables  1 and 2 frameworks presented here are the result of integrating feedback across the professional and disciplinary perspectives. The “ Major features of green building literacy ” are presented in the next section followed by a summary of the three major themes that arose in the focus group settings in reaction to the frameworks. Dr. Laura Cole is an interior design educator and architectural studies scholar who has been involved in the green building movement in various capacities for over 15 years. She worked as a designer in the global architecture firm of Perkins Will where she co-lead the sustainability team and mentored junior designers on their pathways toward becoming LEED accredited professionals. Her Ph.D. work was in the combined areas of Architecture and Natural Resources and Environment. She is now an educator at the University of Missouri where she teaches sustainable design and works on interdisciplinary research teams to advance green building education in theory and practice. Bloom, B. S., Engelhart, bodybuilding science articles